A place of infinite beauty, ...

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A place of infinite beauty, Between Two Waters - Background Info

LOCATION: Municipal Hall Sculpture Garden, Rosina Giles Way
SCULPTURE: A Place of Infinite Beauty, Between Two Waters, 2006
ARTIST: Michel Beauvais
MEDIUM: Serpentine stone and granite

This sculpture was the inaugural artwork for the Sechelt Municipal Hall Sculpture Garden. Artist Michel Beauvais’ proposal was chosen from a number of applications submitted by local artists. When considering this project, Beauvais reflected on what “Sechelt” meant to him, and he kept coming back to the idea of water – its feel and its energy. From here he developed the concept of Sechelt as a place of “infinite (∞) beauty” located between two waters. The basic form of the sculpture looks like an infinity symbol turned on its side, and allows both light and wind to flow through the piece. The wavy lines carved into the top of the sculpture are meant to mimic crashing ocean waves.


A place of infinite beauty - Materials Info

Carved from a locally sourced greenish serpentine stone, this sculpture has a polished finish that glistens in the sun, reminiscent of the light reflecting off the ocean nearby; the varied green tones are similar to that of our Coastal forests. The granite base was left rough and unpolished to reflect the rugged nature of the surrounding landscape.


A place of infinite beauty - Artist Info

Beauvais has been working in stone as a professional sculptor for more than 25 years.  Michel Beauvais is a member of the Kahnawake Mohawk band situated near Montreal. He was raised in Ste-Adele, a small town in the Laurentian Mountains, and close to the influence of his Mohawk community. His grandfather Arthur Areuroktha and his father Maurice were integral to his artistic development through sharing Mohawk myths and legends. Beauvais’ art explores his Mohawk heritage through the incorporation of traditional First Nations symbols and motifs. His work reflects a contemporary vision while strongly echoing traditional Mohawk style.