Maison Delorme-Bouc

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Presentation of Maison Delorme-Bouc

The Maison Delorme-Bouc was built in 1741 by François Simon, known as Delorme. Stone built, it was half of its current size at first and became the northern portion of the building. In 1795 Charles-Baptiste Bouc orders the enlargement of the house to its current size. In 1830, a part of the house is transformed into a hat factory, Abner Bagg Manufacturing.

In 1835, Simon and John Fraser (notary) of Terrebonne buy the building. John establishes his home in the northern part, while leasing the southern part to the County of Terrebonne courthouse. Terrebonne City Council also set up its headquarters here from December 1922 to 1931.

In 1932, Fernand Poitras founded the Home Shoe, a shoe factory, providing employment to the people of Terrebonne for nearly fifty years. In 1949 a fire damages the building and it subsequently undergoes some modifications during its reconstruction. It closes in 1976 because of an unfavourable market in the country. The building was restored in 1989 to regain its original appearance. Today, the building houses lofts and shops.


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Question #20

WHICH FAMOUS GEOGRAPHICAL MAP WAS DESIGNED IN THIS HOUSE IN 1814?

CHOICES
1) Upper Canada and Lower Canada map.
2) Eastern Canada map.
3) Map of Northwest Territory.
4) Western Canada Map.


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Answer and explanation - Question #20

4) Western Canada Map.

The explorer and cartographer David Thompson designed the famous Western map in 1814. This map is 2 m by 3 m.  It spans the area from Lake Superior to the Pacific Ocean, as well as showing the location of all trading posts of the North West Company and also their trade routes. This map is exhibited in the Archives of Ontario and is publicly available. Several years later, he created a very detailed atlas of the area, but no publisher would agree to sell it. He died in Longueuil in 1857, dedicated to a posthumous success.

During his lifetime he had mapped almost one-sixth of the North American continent, representing in detail more than 3.9 million square km. Today, several national parks in western Canada bear his name in tribute to his legacy.


Audio content - Answer&explanation; - Question #20