Ste-Félicité Church & Presbytery

Ste-Félicité Church

A church replaced the chapel in 1868 as the chapel proved too small to accommodate the many parishioners. In 1876, the parishioners once again realized the need to build a new church, but this project was postponed until 1882. At the time of its construction, Ste-Félicité church used to have two steeple. It is possible that the small steeple of the church, whose base was rotten, fell during a big storm in 1931.

Ste-Félicité Church

Inside the church, before major renovations.

Ste-Félicité Church

Ste-Félicité church in 2017.    

Ste-Félicité Presbytery

Ste-Félicité presbytery, built in 1896.

Ste-Félicité Presbytery

Ste-Félicité Presbytery in 2017.

Ste-Félicité Church and Presbytery

The Ste-Félicité church and presbytery in Clarence Creek are considered local historic sites given their architecture and their religious significance within the community.

In 1858, the villagers of Clarence Creek built their first chapel where the church is currently located. The church replaced the chapel in 1868 as the chapel proved too small to accommodate the many parishioners. In 1876, the parishioners once again realized the need to build a new church, but this project was postponed until 1882.

During their many years of service, members of the first church council (which included Léon Laviolette, Magloire Landry, Adolphe Bussière, and Israel Jubinville) supervised the construction of the current church once the construction plans were signed in June 1888. The church was blessed in August 1891. The council also supervised the construction of today’s presbytery from November 1895 to the end of construction on October 30, 1896. Two transepts with a choir-wall were added in 1912.

ANECDOTE

Found in the chronicles of the convent of Ste-Félicité’s nuns that are kept in the archives of the Sisters of Charity of Ottawa:

"On July 2, 1931 at 5 pm, a violent storm struck the village; the wind was so intense that we believed for a moment that the convent would be blown away. The chairs on the porch were swept away by the wind, the exhibit hall at the top of the hill (building located in the West End of the village where horse races took place and an agricultural fair was held in the Fall) was destroyed and the church sheds were moved by a few feet.’’

It is possible that the small steeple of the church, whose base was rotten, fell that same night.



Excerpt of
Clarence Point & Clarence Creek's History

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