Larose Forest

Larose Forest

At the beginning of the 20th century, erosion and desertification were devastating on many of the farms around Bourget and Cheney. Between the villages of Casselman, Bourget and Limoges, farmers abandoned sandy lands, which lead to the expansion of the Bourget desert. Aware of the seriousness of the problem, Ferdinand Larose suggested that those lands be reforested to stop the erosion.

Picture: manual planting of the Larose Forest before Mr. Hurtubise’s famous invention.

Larose Forest

More than 18 million trees have been planted, making the Larose Forest (named in honour of the agronomist, Ferdinand Larose), one of the largest manual plantations of its kind in Canada.     

Larose Forest

Ferdinand Larose hired local workers to plant trees. In 1928, 6,000 pines were planted and since, three generations of forest workers have planted trees and maintained the forest.

Larose Forest

Under the jurisdiction of the Ontario Government, the Larose Forest became a wildlife reserve, a recreation place and a research lab for the improvement of forestry resources.   

Larose Forest

This machine was used to plant trees and was pulled by a bulldozer.

Larose Forest

This planter with scarifying wheels, which opened a furrow for the plantation of trees, was pulled by a tractor.

Larose Forest

This 24 inch plough (built in Embrun) was used to create a furrow in which the trees were planted. It was pulled by a bulldozer or a skidder.

Larose Forest

The story of the Larose Forest started in 1928, when Ferdinand Larose, agronomist, started planting conifers on abandoned farms near Bourget.

At the beginning of the 20th century, erosion and desertification were devastating on the many agricultural farms around Bourget and Cheney. Between the villages of Casselman, Bourget and Limoges, the farmers abandoned sandy lands, which lead to the expansion of the "Bourget desert". Aware of the seriousness of the problem, Ferdinand Larose suggested that those lands be reforested to stop the erosion.

Ferdinand Larose was hired by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, soon after graduating from the Agricultural Institute of Oka in 1918. He was assigned to the United Counties of Prescott and Russell.

In 1928, Mr. Larose, with the help of the regional and provincial governments, bought back the abandoned farmlands and hired local workers to plant trees. In 1928, 6,000 pines were planted and since then, three generations of forest workers have planted trees and maintained the forest.

Today, more than 18 million trees have been planted, making the Larose Forest one of the largest man-made plantation of its kind in Canada.  Larose Forest is undeniably very important to the Counties of Prescott and Russell. It covers an area of over 27,000 acres, which runs from the Cheney, Hammond, Bourget, Casselman and Limoges territories. It is home to a good variety of plants and wildlife. Its majestic pines, planted in straight lines, give it a natural cathedral look; the perfect place for many outdoor activities.

Under the jurisdiction of the Ontario Government, the Larose Forest became a wildlife reserve, a recreation area and a research lab for the improvement of forestry resources.  In 2000, management of the forest was entrusted to the United Counties of Prescott and Russell. 



Excerpt of
Bourget's History

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